Frozen II parents guide

Frozen II Parent Guide

This movie is less about following your heart and more about following moral imperatives, however agonizing the consequences.

Overall A-

Arendelle faces a new threat- a strange magic which seems to come from the ancient and enchanted forest. Elsa, Anna, Kristoff, Olaf, and Sven will have to work together to get past the forest's defenses and find the cause of the problem.

Release date November 22, 2019

Violence B-
Sexual Content A
Profanity A
Substance Use A

Why is Frozen II rated PG? The MPAA rated Frozen II PG for action/peril and some thematic elements.

Run Time: 103 minutes

Parent Movie Review

The turbulent events of Frozen behind her, Queen Elsa (voiced by Idina Menzel) is ruling Arendelle with the support of her loyal sister Anna (voiced by Kristen Bell). Kristoff (voiced by Jonathan Groff) is bumbling through his attempts to propose to Anna, to the despair of his reindeer, Sven. And thanks to Elsa’s magic permafrost, Olaf the snowman (voiced by Josh Gad) is free to bask in the sunshine and meditate aloud on his growing maturity.

Then Elsa starts hearing voices.

When Elsa answers the voices, the power of the elemental spirits of earth, air, fire, and water is unleashed. Windstorms batter Arendelle and the earth heaves, forcing an evacuation of the kingdom. Desperate to save their people, Elsa, Anna, and Kristoff head north to a mist-encircled magical forest, home of the Northuldra people, where Elsa believes she will find a way to appease the elements.

Frozen II is a very different movie from the 2013 blockbuster hit; darker and more complex. The first Frozen was a movie about love in romantic and sisterly guises. This sequel is a sterner film, about duty to country, duty to the truth, and duty to oneself. It’s less about following your heart and more about following moral imperatives, however agonizing the consequences. “Do the next right thing”, King Runeard told his daughters before his death, and that maxim guides the conduct of both girls, now powerful young women, in their perilous quest. When Anna believes all is lost, his words are what keep her moving as she sings the emotional centerpiece of the movie, “The Next Right Thing”.

The film isn’t all dark; Kristoff’s inept romantic efforts provide some comic relief and Olaf elicits one laugh after another. At the screening I attended, the theater was regularly swept with waves of laughter as the kids chortled over Olaf’s physical missteps, jokes, and irrepressible (often misguided) optimism. The soundtrack ably supports the story, although without a breakout hit like “Let It Go” (which will probably be a relief to parents). Olaf sings about how everything will make sense when he grows up, to wry chuckles from adults. And Kristoff belts out an angsty love song that looks and feels like an ‘80’s music video.

The light moments are needed because the film’s story is fraught with peril. There are a few battle scenes and some people are killed off screen. Magical fire traps characters, the cast are swept up inside a tornado, Elsa is attacked by a water creature, and rock giants throw boulders and try to stomp people. And to make it much worse, two major characters have death scenes. This really isn’t a movie for preschoolers, especially if they cry easily.

For kids who won’t be scared by the dangers inherent in the story, Frozen II, has a lot to offer. Its messages about integrity are supplemented by its examination of environmental stewardship, relationships with indigenous peoples, moving past fear, and righting past wrongs. Far from being frozen in a fairy tale formula, this movie has a lot to say in today’s world.

Directed by Chris Buck & Jennifer Lee. Starring Kirsten Bell, Jason Ritter, and Idina Menzel. Running time: 103 minutes. Theatrical release November 22, 2019. Updated

Watch the trailer for Frozen II

Frozen II
Rating & Content Info

Why is Frozen II rated PG? Frozen II is rated PG by the MPAA for action/peril and some thematic elements.

Violence: A battle is briefly shown and men fight with swords and shields. No injuries are seen. A man raises his sword against an unarmed man; he kills him off screen. A man is thrown over a cliff; his fall is not seen. There are scenes of magical fire putting people in peril. Rock giants throw boulders at people and almost stomp on them. Two main characters have death scenes. People are endangered by fierce winds and heaving earth. There is a brief scene in a dark forest where a character is frightened by creatures with red eyes and sharp teeth. Main characters get sucked inside a tornado. A character is in peril in the ocean and fights with a water creature. A main character is pushed into a canoe and sent on a perilous journey. Ice statues replicate the last moments of people’s lives.
Sexual Content: A man and woman kiss and embrace on a few occasions.
Profanity: None noted.
Alcohol / Drug Use:   None noted.

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Frozen II Parents' Guide

Does your country’s history involve different groups of people sharing the land? Does your country have an indigenous population and later settlement by other people? Was there conflict between the groups? Do the different groups see history the same way or do their perspectives vary? What can you learn from understanding someone else’s perspective on history?

Loved this movie? Try these books…

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Home Video

Related home video titles:

Frozen launched a cultural phenomenon as kids fell in love with Anna and Elsa and belted out round after round of “Let It Go”.

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe features another character with the ability to produce winter weather.

If you want a gentle tale of winter adventure suitable for young viewers, watch Racetime. This story of a toboggan race is safe even for preschoolers.

A reindeer stars in Blizzard, a Christmas tale about a reindeer with not one, but three, magical powers.

Sisters work together to reunite their parents in The Parent Trap. And sisters Ramona and Beezus love each other, despite their differences..