The Room parents guide

The Room Parent Guide

This film's interesting premise is undermined by dreadful scenes of sexual violence.

Overall D

Digital on Demand: Having moved to a secluded, run down manor in rural Maryland, Matt and Kate find that the house has many secrets - including a solid steel door, leading to a seemingly empty room. But the room isn't quite as vacant as it appears...

Release date July 21, 2020

Violence C
Sexual Content D
Profanity D
Substance Use C-

Why is The Room rated R? The MPAA rated The Room R

Run Time: 100 minutes

Parent Movie Review

Matt (Kevin Janssens), a struggling artist, has bought an abandoned home in upstate New York, hoping that it will inspire his work. After he moves in with his wife Kate (Olga Kurylenko), they find a hidden room – and this isn’t just any room. If either of them wishes for anything in that room, it appears – money, champagne, fancy clothing, any material possession they can think of. After a few days of drunken debauchery, the couple realize that they aren’t really any happier than they were before they had piles of cash in their living room. Thinking seriously, Kate decides to try and use the room to have something she’s always wanted – a child. But there are consequences to using the room, and things are more complicated than either Kate or Matt can imagine…

The Room isn’t trying to be scary so much as thought provoking. The “horror” comes from the consequences of poor decision making, but it doesn’t ever become truly frightening. The film tries a few jump scares, but since there’s little tension and nothing to be properly scared of, even those fail to pump any adrenaline. The thought experiment also struggles to outlast the runtime, but the film shifts gears around the third act to compensate and it seems to help keep the film from feeling tired.

Despite its interesting premise, The Room is grossly unsuitable for family viewing. It manages to avoid the relentless profanity, gore, and substance use I would have expected from an “R” rated horror flick, but it catches up with two truly unsettling depictions of sexual assault. There isn’t any explicitly sexual nudity in the film, but frankly, if it meant the absence of an arguably incestuous rape scene, I would have traded for it in a heartbeat. I don’t think that’s what people meant when they said they want more “family togetherness” on screen.

To paraphrase that wise philosopher, Mick Jagger, “You shouldn’t always get what you want”. Unlimited acquisition of material wealth at no apparent cost and for no purpose other than possession is clearly terrible for people, and it doesn’t do Matt or Kate any favors. This is also a great advertisement for not having children, especially in cursed houses. You’d think people would have learned after the first dozen movies about haunted kids, but nope. Every year, a new batch of morons move into large abandoned country estates and realize, as if for the first time, why they were abandoned in the first place. Pro tip: If the locals refer to your new address as “House of Blood”, maybe think twice before trying to get that mattress up the stairs.

Directed by Christian Volckman. Starring Olga Kurylenko, Kevin Janssens, and Joshua Wilson. Running time: 100 minutes. Theatrical release July 21, 2020. Updated

The Room
Rating & Content Info

Why is The Room rated R? The Room is rated R by the MPAA

Violence: An individual is shot at. Characters are shown with minor injuries as a result of a fistfight. A person is stabbed. A person rapidly ages and turns to dust.
Sexual Content: There are two sex scenes, neither of which contains graphic nudity. There is a scene depicting a woman breastfeeding a baby. There is a scene depicting arguably incestuous rape.
Profanity: There are six uses of a sexual expletive and two uses of scatological curses. There are occasional uses of terms of deity.
Alcohol / Drug Use: Characters are shown drinking alcohol and, on one occasion, smoking cigarettes.

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Related home video titles:

There are more than a few “creepy cursed kid” movies. In recent years, those include Brahms: The Boy II, The Turning, and Gretel and Hansel.

Family-friendly movies about the dangers of getting what you want include Aladdin, Four Kids and It, 17 Again, and Second Act.