Have a Good Trip parents guide

Have a Good Trip Parent Guide

Streaming on Netflix: This isn't a trip most of us are going to want to take.

Overall C-

Netflix: A documentary exploring the wild world of psychedelic drugs and the people who use them.

Release date May 11, 2020

Violence A
Sexual Content B
Profanity D
Substance Use D

Why is Have a Good Trip rated TV-MA? The MPAA rated Have a Good Trip TV-MA

Run Time: 85 minutes

Parent Movie Review

Psychedelic drugs have had a long impact on our culture - from musical acts like Jefferson Airplane and The Beatles to authors like Aldous Huxley and Hunter S. Thompson, drug use has been behind some huge artistic achievements. But what are these substances like on a personal level? Have a Good Trip sets out to explore those experiences through interviews with celebrities and scientists.

Before you get all nervous about this being an ad for hallucinogens, the documentary is pretty clear that LSD isn’t for everyone: several of the people they interview have had deeply unpleasant experiences, and aren’t shy about describing exactly how things went wrong for them. Even for people who fully expected to enjoy their trip, things had a tendency to spiral off in strange directions…

Parents are not going to be happy with a movie that focuses on drugs, but the one consolation here is the harm mitigation message: don’t drive high, don’t trip with people you don’t like, and keep an eye on your clothes. The message more than anything seems to be that there are some ways that are significantly better than others to take drugs, and that has led to positive experiences for some people.

But, not unlike ‘shrooms, this documentary probably isn’t for everyone. If you find drug use upsetting, obviously this may not be a fantastic choice. Moreover, the frequent use of profanity makes this unsuitable for many audiences. It is, however, remarkably free of most other content concerns. While still pretty “adult” for a documentary, Have a Nice Trip seems to be trying to maintain some moderation in its content, all things considered.

I don’t think this is the kind of film likely to encourage anyone to take drugs who wasn’t already interested in doing so. Hearing a certain hallucinogen described as “an express ticket to the primordial ooze” ought to be a good warning. More importantly, Have a Nice Trip points out some of the legitimate medical research that’s being done on these drugs and the potential benefits they have in treating a variety of conditions. If nothing else, this is an interesting documentary to watch just to hear some absolutely insane stories from public figures but parents looking for a clear “just say no” message are not going to want any of their family members to go on the trip this offbeat documentary takes.

Directed by Donick Cary. Starring Nick Offerman, Adam Scott, and Carrie Fisher.. Running time: 85 minutes. Theatrical release May 11, 2020. Updated

Have a Good Trip
Rating & Content Info

Why is Have a Good Trip rated TV-MA? Have a Good Trip is rated TV-MA by the MPAA

Violence: None.
Sexual Content: There are references to female nudity and toplessness with no on-screen activity. An individual relates a sexual experience with no on-screen activity.
Profanity: There are 26 uses of extreme profanity, 16 uses of scatological cursing, and infrequent use of other profanities and terms of deity.
Alcohol / Drug Use: Individuals are frequently depicted taking drugs of all descriptions, including LSD, psilocybin, cocaine, marijuana, and peyote.

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Have a Good Trip Parents' Guide

As the documentary mentions, psychedelic drugs could have a number of significant benefits in treatment of mental health conditions. As with any medication, they would have a number of side effects and potential problems. Do you think that in a medical context these would be any more or less dangerous than other comparable pharmaceuticals? What do you think public access should be to psychedelics on a recreational basis?

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Perhaps one of the best known novels about the high-intensity use of hard drugs is Hunter S. Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, which not only covers his insane substance use over a few weeks in the desert, but also the waning of the hippie movement in American politics following the election of Richard Nixon.

Home Video

Related home video titles:

There are a number of family-friendly films that have associations with drug culture. Disney’s Alice in Wonderland (and the live-action remake) have been linked with hallucinogens. The Beatles 1968 film Yellow Submarine is also heavily influenced by their use of psychedelic drugs, presented through a combination of music and animation. Coraline and Spirited Away both have a strange, dream-like quality.