Extraction parents guide

Extraction Parent Guide

Netflix: With a plot that feels like it came out of a can, all that's left is non-stop scenes of bloody, gory violence.

Overall D

Netflix: Gun-for-hire Tyler Rake is working the deadliest mission of his life - rescuing the son of a dangerous international drug lord from a rival criminal. And the clock is running out...

Release date April 24, 2020

Violence D
Sexual Content A
Profanity D
Substance Use D

Why is Extraction rated R? The MPAA rated Extraction R for strong bloody violence throughout, language and brief drug use.

Run Time: 120 minutes

Parent Movie Review

Tyler Rake (Chris Hemsworth) is a skilled mercenary who has spent his adult life in some of the most dangerous parts of the world, working for (or against) some of the most dangerous people. His reputation for violence has brought him to the attention of Saju (Randeep Hooda), the lieutenant for India’s biggest drug lord whose son, Ovi (Rudraksh Jaiswal) has been kidnapped by one of his rivals, Amir Ashif (Priyanshi Painyuli). But when Tyler finds the kid, he also realizes that this op was bigger than he expected. Now he’s on the run from police, thugs, and his own employer.

This isn’t exactly a breakthrough in the genre. Someone at Netflix went into a big warehouse, pulled a script out of a box labeled “Generic Action Movie No. 2”, and cast the biggest star they could in the lead to make sure it drew viewers. So don’t go into this expecting some dramatic, heartfelt, well-considered action. Expect to see Chris Hemsworth shooting his way through Bangladesh and making an absolute mess of the place.

But plot isn’t really that important in a shoot-em-up action thriller. Combat choreography is where the money is, and Extraction does a passable job at that. One of the film’s initial car chases has been designed to look like one take, and although you can spot a few cuts, it’s very smooth and largely impressive. The way the camera slides in and out of different moving cars is really cool, if that’s your kind of thing.

Extraction falls into the category of “messy” action - you know, the kind where people bleed when you shoot them (as opposed to PG-13 action, where they just fall over). In this film, they just so happen to bleed a lot. It’s sort of like watching a bunch of Capri-Sun juice packets with firecrackers in them. I can deal with that, but this film has a disconcerting amount of violence directed against children. The rival drug lord seems to have a small army of children, one of whom gets beaten by our ever-benevolent hero - but it’s fine, because he didn’t shoot them or anything, I guess. That plus the profanity and occasional drug use makes this totally unsuitable for family viewing.

While the action is largely well done, I have a few issues with Extraction that make it hard to recommend to anyone. I dislike the trope of the brooding white guy with some vague personal tragedy in his past using said vague trauma as an excuse for slaughtering dozens of people for money. Call me picky, but I find a man who literally kills for the highest bidder hard to root for as the ethical hero of the piece. Sure, he hasn’t shot a kid lately (which does make him stand out in this movie), but he’s still an international gun for hire with very few qualms about how much murder it takes for him to get paid. Hardly an endearing quality.

Directed by Sam Hargrave. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Rudhraksh Jaiswal, and Shivam Vichare. Running time: 120 minutes. Theatrical release April 24, 2020. Updated

Extraction
Rating & Content Info

Why is Extraction rated R? Extraction is rated R by the MPAA for strong bloody violence throughout, language and brief drug use.

Violence: Dozens of people are bloodily shot to death, including some teenagers. A child is thrown off a roof. People are severely beaten. An individual is choked to death. A person is stabbed through the face with a rake. People are hit by cars. People are blown up. A person sets his own broken nose. An individual is shown after cutting off their own finger.
Sexual Content: None.
Profanity: There are 19 uses of extreme profanity, 14 uses of scatological curses, and dozens of other profanities and terms of deity.
Alcohol / Drug Use: People are shown drinking in a social context. An individual is implied to be abusing oxycontin. Teenagers are shown smoking marijuana.

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Extraction Parents' Guide

How does the movie script try to excuse Tyler Rake’s occupation and violent behavior? Do you think those reasons are valid?

Home Video

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Perhaps the best version of this film’s take on kinetic action is the John Wick series, which has bar none the most incredible combat choreography and cinematography in the genre. Those looking for another interpretation might enjoy Gemini Man, starring Will Smith and…Will Smith. (Just don’t watch it in 3-D.) The Bourne Identity and its sequels, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum, also feature elaborate action sequences, but with a more spy/thriller plot.

This movie features a very well-armed and prepared response from Indian government forces- something that has not always been the case. Hotel Mumbai depicts the real-life 2008 terrorist attack on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in India, and the response of the unprepared and ill-equipped local police.