xXx: The Return of Xander Cage parents guide

xXx: The Return of Xander Cage Parent Guide

The male fantasy movie’s real focus is creating action sequences -- plot is just an incidental detail.

Overall C

xXx is believed dead --- but Xander Cage (Vin Diesel), the extreme athlete turned government agent, gets back into the game when a friend is killed and his country begs him to help stop powerful technology from falling into dangerous hands.

Release date January 20, 2017

Violence C-
Sexual Content C
Profanity D
Substance Use B-

Why is xXx: The Return of Xander Cage rated PG-13? The MPAA rated xXx: The Return of Xander Cage PG-13 for extended sequences of gunplay and violent action, and for sexual material and language.

Run Time: 107 minutes

Official Movie Site

Parent Movie Review

The good, the bad, the extreme and the insane. That is how Xander Cage (Vin Diesel) describes the team he puts together to go after a stolen piece of powerful technology called Pandora’s Box.

In truth, the extreme athlete who was pressed into service (as seen in the 2002 film xXx) by an unconventional recruiter for the National Security Agency, had never intended to come out of retirement. But loyalty to his former boss Gibbons (Samuel L. Jackson), plus the call to be a patriot by a new department head (Toni Collette), eventually coax the reluctant agent into doing his duty again. However, nothing will convince the rebel to do it the traditional way. Hence his choice of eclectic helpers (played by Ruby Rose, Kris Wu and Rory McCann).

The first order of business is to track down the mysterious, highly-trained group of thieves that took Pandora’s Box in the first place. This requires Triple X to do a little “undercover” work (an orgy is implied) and then travel to an isolated, off-the-grid island (which still has enough power to run a wild rave complete with lights, music, well-stocked bar and sensually dancing women). There the operative finds his targets (Donnie Yen, Deepika Padukone, Tony Jaa and Michael Bisping) and discovers they have something in common – they have all been members of Gibbons’ organization. That means they are equally matched as opponents. Where they differ is in what they think they should be done with the stolen hardware. The dangerous gadget has already been used by an unknown terrorist to bring down a satellite and crash it into a populated city.

With this premise, the script is set up to examine trust: Who should be given control of such a weapon? With whom should the characters place their allegiances? What ulterior motives might they be hiding? While some of those questions are explored, in reality the film’s plot is just an incidental detail in this male fantasy.

The movie’s real focus is creating action sequences, like heist scenes, stunts with skis, skateboards, motorcycles, cars and planes, as well as spectacular crashes and explosions. Combat is pervasive and includes fistfights, martial arts moves, gun and weapon use, along with depictions of deaths, injuries, bloody wounds and bone breaking sound effects. Characters even play in traffic – beating one another while trying to avoid oncoming vehicles. Interspersed with these violent portrayals are plenty of peeks at scantily clad girls, and a brief sexual encounter with passionate kissing, moans and fondling. Profanities are shot about too, along with a strong sexual expletive and three crude finger gestures.

Anyone who has seen the other offerings in this franchise (a sequel, xXx: State of the Union, released in 2005) are likely to find much of the same thing presented here. Yet those looking for family entertainment may feel like they are also dealing with the good, the bad, the extreme and the insane. The characters do want to do good in the world, but they aren’t afraid to do bad things to meet those objectives. Meanwhile, their extremely reckless behavior makes them terrible role models, and you’d have to be insane to believe the implausible stunts (motorcycles that can run underwater, people surviving falls from airplanes) and brainless attraction the many babes have for this brawny bad boy.

Directed by D.J. Caruso. Starring Toni Collette, Vin Diesel, Samuel L. Jackson, Deepika Padukone, Donnie Yen. Running time: 107 minutes. Theatrical release January 20, 2017. Updated

xXx: The Return of Xander Cage
Rating & Content Info

Why is xXx: The Return of Xander Cage rated PG-13? xXx: The Return of Xander Cage is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for extended sequences of gunplay and violent action, and for sexual material and language.

Violence:
Frequent portrayals of non-graphic violence, including gun battles, knife threats, martial arts combat, fistfights, bone breaking body holds and explosions. Infrequently these depictions include bloody wounds. Many injuries and deaths are implied, and a few corpses are seen. Point blank shootings are shown on screen. Characters are in peril, often by choice. Characters engage in reckless driving (cars, motorcycles and boats), as well as extreme sports and stunting on skis and skateboards. Spectacular car crashes and chases are shown. Characters run through traffic and begin fighting as vehicles swerve to avoid them. Crime and rebellion are glamorized. A sniper disarms safari hunters, injuring one and leaving them to be preyed on by a lion. People fall and are thrown from heights. Terrorist activities kill and injure the public. Planes and satellites fall to the earth in a blaze of explosions and falling debris. Hits to the groin are shown. Characters are threatened and killed with grenades.

Sexual Content:
Frequent depictions of women in bikinis or other skimpy clothing. Sexual banter, references and innuendo are heard. A brief portrayal of sexual activity (with passionate kissing, fondling, sexual sounds) is included. Women dance seductively. Characters embrace and kiss. An orgy is implied after a group of women body search a man. A woman confesses to appearing nude in public.

Profanity:
Three sexual finger gestures are seen and one use of a sexual expletive is heard. Frequent use of scatological slang, mild and moderate profanity and terms of deity. Crude anatomical terms and racial slurs are also included.

Alcohol / Drug Use:
Characters drink alcohol in clubs, bars and private meetings. Illegal drug use is mentioned. Tobacco use.

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More parents' guide for xXx: The Return of Xander Cage after the break...

xXx: The Return of Xander Cage Parents' Guide

Most of the characters depicted in this movie have a rebellious attitude. How does the script make them rebels with a cause? How do you feel about Serena’s (Deepika Padukone) motives after she claims that she decided to change the world instead of rage against it?

In reality, does being disobedient to rules and laws make a person a good candidate for secret service to their country? How might ignoring orders create trust problems? Why is it hard to accomplish anything in a group where everyone would rather follow their own plan?

How are women portrayed in this movie? How many of them are depicted as sexually alluring? How many appear to be smart? How are the men depicted? Do they possess any other traits, besides strength and fighting skills? Are either of these gender depictions accurate representations of men or women?

Home Video

The most recent home video release of xXx: The Return of Xander Cage movie is May 16, 2017. Here are some details…

Home Video Notes: xXx: The Return of Xander Cage
Release Date: 16 May 2017
xXx: The Return of Xander Cage releases to home video (Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy) with the following special features:
- Third Time’s the Charm: Xander Returns
- Rebels, Tyrants & Ghosts: The Cast
- Opening Pandora’s Box: On Location
- I Live for This Sh#t!: Stunts
- Gag Reel

Related home video titles:

Other movies in the franchise include xXx and xXx: State of the Union.