Pirate’s Code: The Adventures of Mickey Matson parents guide

Pirate’s Code: The Adventures of Mickey Matson Parent Review

Overall B

A modern-day pirate (Frank Collison) wants the world to return to it's old fashioned way of doing things by removing technology. When all else fails, it is up to Mickey Matson (Derek Brandon) and his friend Sully (Francesca Derosa) to stop his diabolical plan.

Violence C+
Sexual Content A-
Profanity A-
Substance Use A

Pirate’s Code: The Adventures of Mickey Matson is rated Not Rated

Movie Review

Mickey Matson (Derek Brandon) has been counting the days, and it has been more than 500, since he first learned about the order of The Patriots and, with his friend Sully (Francesca Derosa), helped save the world from total disaster. (This story is told in the first movie of the series, The Adventures of Mickey Matson and the Copperhead Treasure.) Fortunately for the youth, his time for feeling bored and under-appreciated is about to come to an end because there is a new threat to global security.

Admiral Ironsides (Frank Collison) is a one-eyed, harpoon-handed, modern-day pirate with a vendetta against modern-day technology. Concocting a diabolical plot to destroy everything electronic, the evil villain and his band of smarmy seaman begin by assisting a couple of jailbirds (Jack Nathan Harding and Frank Drank) to fly the coop. These two stooges are former Copperheads whom Mickey helped to incarcerate.

The Patriots are aware that something bad is a-brewin’, so Mickey and Sully are again recruited. This time the pair are kidnapped and taken to a clandestine training facility where they are supposed to hone their sleuthing/combat skills before tackling the pirates. But before their education can be completed, Ironsides’ minions storm the school and take everyone hostage—everyone that is except Mickey and Sully. Now it is up to the teens to scuttle the menacing maniac’s scheme, rescue their friends and protect Earth’s unsuspecting population.

This adventure series deserves credit for its sheer ambition. The production includes action sequences, weapons like ray guns and a Tesla Coil cannon, as well as an amphibious vehicle—all of which require some demanding choreography and special effects. The casting department has pulled together some oldies but goodies, like Christopher Lloyd (Back to the Future) and Tia Carrere (Wayne’s World and voice of Nani in Lilo & Stitch). And the young actors show great promise.

Unfortunately, it does not all come together like well-cut interlocking puzzle pieces. The farcical depictions of the bad guys (who I suspect play their roles over-the-top to ensure the movie won’t be too frightening for little children) don’t fit very snugly next to the earnest portrayals of the good guys. And the well-intentioned script leaves a few holes vacant in the plot’s big picture.

Still, there is one thing Mickey Matson does offer in spades—and that’s messages about teamwork, humility, being your best self, forgiveness and respecting your elders. So if your kids are looking for high adventure with some good morals and positive role models, Pirate’s Code might be worth cracking open at your next family movie night.

Directed by Harold Cronk. Starring Derek Brandon, Tia Carrere, Christopher Lloyd, Frank Collison, Francesca Derosa. Running time: 91 minutes. Updated

Get details on profanity, sex and violence in Pirate’s Code: The Adventures of Mickey Matson here.

Pirate’s Code: The Adventures of Mickey Matson Parents Guide

This movie is a sequel to The Adventures of Mickey Matson and the Copperhead Treasure.

After all the excitement of his first adventure, Mickey Matson comes home and begins to feel just ordinary—not special. How does this attitude affect his decisions even when he is again called into service with The Patriots? Why does it make it hard for him to be a dependable team player? What is it that he is trying to prove to himself and others?

This film makes a point of showing that elderly people are still important both in their contribution to society and in their relationships with younger generations. How have you benefited from your interactions with people older than yourself? One of the actors who embodies this idea is Christopher Lloyd, who was 76 at the time this movie was shot in 2014. Mr. Lloyd played a similar, aging character in the classic film Back to the Future—although in 1985 the actor was only 47, and the convincing grey hair and wrinkles were the work of a good make-up artist.