Lara Croft: The Cradle of Life parents guide

Lara Croft: The Cradle of Life Parent Review

Overall C

Lara Croft (Angelina Jolie) would rather enjoy life as a recreational tomb raider instead of answering the call to serve her country and the world. But alas, all play and no work can make for a dull existence, and even the hardened heroine can't refuse the call to stop a maniacal mastermind.

Violence D
Sexual Content B
Profanity B-
Substance Use A-

Why is Lara Croft: The Cradle of Life rated PG-13? The MPAA rated Lara Croft: The Cradle of Life PG-13 for action violence and some sensuality
Latest home video release July 15, 2014
Run Time: 117 minutes

Movie Review

Lara Croft (Angelina Jolie) would rather enjoy life as a recreational tomb raider instead of answering the call to serve her country and the world. But alas, all play and no work can make for a dull existence, and even the hardened heroine can't refuse the call to stop a maniacal mastermind.

On the verge of world domination is Dr. Jonathan Reiss (CiarĂ¡n Hinds). His hobby of creating biological weapons has him on the lookout for new ideas, the latest being the fabled Pandora's Box, rumored to be hidden somewhere in Africa in an area known as "The Cradle of Life."

Opening the box will set off the deadliest plague the world has ever known. The aggressive entrepreneur is certain whatever made Pandora regret her curiosity can be divvyed up and sold for some good money to other nasty people. And like so many movie madmen, he obviously hasn't bothered to consider such consequences as who on earth will be left to fly his plane and take care of all his other "necessities."

With both parties racing to locate the antiquity, the initial panic is to translate a map found on the outside of a golden orb. Reiss has the orb and Croft needs to get her hands on it before he finishes extracting the information. Conveniently the chase stops at various worldwide locales, which provide some beautiful backdrops for this visually appealing film.

Like the last Tomb Raider, this movie is low on profanities (some mild language along with one use of the usual scatological term) and even lighter in sexual content (one passionate clothed moment is brought to a sudden halt). Yet some parents may object to the many scenes of violence.

Guns and knives are the favored weapons, but fists, kicks, and any other handy item are used to maim and murder a generous amount of no-name characters. Often shootings and other killing appear onscreen, although they are usually without gore. And while the story is implausible, much of the violence it contains is not softened by its fantastical nature, such as the depiction of an unsuspecting man sipping a drink that is laced with a deadly virus. The result is an extended scene with the character choking and coughing up blood before he dies.

Like the first movie, the characters perform some stunning stunts, including a jump from a 1,000-foot Hong Kong building by two people wearing unique winged suits. But this newest incarnation of the buxom video game babe offers a more simplistic script with stock good and bad guys, and a body count that prevents it from racking up a high score for family viewing.

Directed by Jan de Bont. Starring Angelina Jolie, Gerard Butler. Running time: 117 minutes. Updated

Lara Croft: The Cradle of Life Parents Guide

Lately many movies are featuring heroes who are criminals. In this case Lara Croft relies on the help of a friend whom she has to release from jail. How do you feel about this recurring trend?

Many of the characters in this film are motivated by money and personal gain? Yet Lara is portrayed as having ethics. What are some things Lara won’t sell out for? What values do you hold above money?

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