Jason Bourne parents guide

Jason Bourne Parent Review

Watching Damon return to his iconic role will also be gratifying for anyone who loves the world of spy-craft

Overall B-

After suffering from amnesia and searching for years to discover who he was, Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) is now beginning to remember his past. But the rouge undercover agent is still having trouble reconciling what was and what is.

Violence C-
Sexual Content A
Profanity B-
Substance Use A

Jason Bourne is rated PG-13 for intense sequences of violence and action, and brief strong language.

Movie Review

When we last left Jason Bourne, he was standing on the tip of an iceberg leading to information about his life before becoming a lethal CIA operative. Little did he know just how much more was under the surface. Nicky Parsons (Julia Stiles) has discovered new facts about Bourne’s past which, of course, yanks him out of obscurity and straight onto the radar of the federal agency’s director Robert Dewey (Tommy Lee Jones). Also at the Langley offices is Heather Lee (Alicia Vikander), a new and ambitious employee eager to prove her worth. She orchestrates many of the road blocks thrown up in an effort to bring Bourne in alive.

Meanwhile, Bourne remembers everything—or at least, he thinks he does. With this restored knowledge he criss-crosses the globe, piecing together the new bits that have come to light. At the same time the fugitive is being hunted by another government trained asset (Vincent Cassel) with an ax to grind.

Even as Bourne is faced with situations, such as navigating turbulent crowds amidst tear gas and Molotov cocktails, we still see a noble character in this expertly trained assassin. He never was one to shy away from a fight with his fists or a gun, and that is the case again in this film. The interesting thing is that there is a level of humanity when he has to engage in the violence that seems to follow him wherever he goes. Yet the only times he takes someone out is when he deems it absolutely necessary. It is kind of a “Well, it’s him or me.” type of thing. On the other hand, the vengeful stalker working for the CIA director murders indiscriminately, shooting or strangling anyone who gets between him and his objective. It is easy to assume that having a conscience isn’t high on the list of qualities one would find in a tightly wound killing machine.

This newest instalment of the Bourne Movies offers an exciting script and plenty of action to keep you engaged. As a fan of the franchise from the beginning, I enjoyed learning more about Bourne’s shrouded backstory. (Not to worry… no spoilers here). Moving at a fast pace, with lots of connections to recent world events, the movie brings a feeling of reality to the screen—rather than just entertainment. Unfortunately, some of the fight sequences are choppy and occasionally it is difficult to feel like they are part of a continuous scene. The young age of the Heather Lee character feels a bit out of place too, especially in comparison to the cast of other seasoned veterans. Joan Allen’s portrayal of Pamela Landey (as seen in The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum) seemed more in line with other high level CIA officials.

Playing on the stereotypical attitude that the government cannot be trusted to control its clandestine operations, the film portrays Director Dewey as using the guise of National Security to accomplish his hidden agenda. Then, when the plot comes to its boiling point, our indestructible hero seems immune to injury. After a wild car chase through Sin City’s infamous Strip, despite several collisions and the air bags failing to deploy, Bourne and his vehicle remain relatively unscathed. In past depictions Bourne appeared more “human” and less like a fictitious superhero who barely bruises.

Still, for those who have followed Jason Bourne’s journey since the first release back in 2002, it is nice that this 2016 script finally answers some of those elusive questions that have nagged us. Watching Damon return to his iconic role will also be gratifying for anyone who loves the world of spy-craft.

Directed by Paul Greengrass. Starring Matt Damon, Alicia Vikander, Julia Stiles . Running time: 123 minutes. Updated

Get details on profanity, sex and violence in Jason Bourne here.

Jason Bourne Parents Guide

Many recent terror events have left hundreds of people dead or seriously injured. Yet we rarely hear about the psychological impact victims and witnesses deal with – on the new or in the movies. How might audiences around the world feel as they view fictionalized scenes of rioting, innocent people being shot or vehicles careening into crowds of the unsuspecting public? Does the negative portrayal of Government Officials also sour our view of national leaders?

Hollywood has been under fire in the media for constantly using very young women in lead roles opposite much older men. This film is no different. What might this do to the public’s opinion of the value of women? Is there anything the viewing public can do to help industry insiders realize that we are intelligent enough to know that women 35 and beyond are still beautiful, strong, desirable and not obsolete. How might you use your voice to dispel the myth that audience don’t want to see older female actors?