Head of State parents guide

Head of State Parent Review

In his directorial debut, Chris Rock takes a jab at back room wrangling and party partisanship associated with the presidential primary.

Overall C

With only weeks left until Election Tuesday, the Democrats are in trouble. Their candidate and his running mate are dead following a freak accident. Just as unbelievable is the choice to have a little respected Washington D.C. alderman (Chris Rock) run for President their stead.

Violence C+
Sexual Content C+
Profanity D+
Substance Use C

Head of State is rated PG-13 for language, some sexuality and drug references.

Movie Review

With only weeks left until Election Tuesday, the Democrats are in trouble. Their candidate and his running mate are dead following a freak accident. Unwilling to concede the victory to Vice President Lewis (Nick Searcy), the party leader Bill Arnot (James Rebhorn) and his committee look for a quick replacement.

Working out of a street corner office in his rundown neighborhood, Mays Gilliam (Chris Rock) is a Washington D.C. alderman. He tackles issues like bus service, community crime and lost kittens. But this man of the people has problems of his own. His girlfriend Kim (Robin Givens) has just made a cantankerous exit. Fed up with playing secretary to a loser, she jumps ship when she fails to see anything in his career for her.

With one piece of bad luck following another, this unlikely stand-in is approached by Arnot to run for the country's highest office.

Review continues after the break...

Mays, underdressed and inexperienced for heavy hitting politics, is outfitted with an expert election entourage. Debra Lassiter (Lynn Whitfield) is a by-the-books political advisor who hesitantly accepts the assignment to work with campaign manager, Martin Gellen (Dylan Baker). Rounding out the delegation is Nicki (Stephanie March), a tall, blonde worker who takes care of the intimate needs of the candidate and a body double (Ray Clark) who ensures Mays' safety. Hitting the road in a chartered bus, the group heads out on the promotion trail to win points in the polls.

But before long, Mays discovers all the public appearances, party hobnobbing and pre-written speeches don't reflect him. Finally, when his opponent unleashes a mudslinging ad blitz aimed at the upstart politician, Mays decides to take the driver's seat. He picks his brother, Mitch (Bernie Mac), a bail bondsman, for his running mate and together they begin an unorthodox bid for the White House.

Making his directorial debut, Rock takes a jab at back room wrangling and party partisanship associated with the presidential primary. But he also rekindles the ideal that even individuals can make a difference while pursuing their American Dream. Along the way this underdog from Ward 9 upsets the political machine and shakes up a roomful of stuffy supporters as he learns to stay true to his beliefs and the people he represents.

Unfortunately the script (which Rock co-wrote) contains a landslide of profanities. Brotherly punches, pedestrian accidents and security measures also push the limits of the film's slapstick comedy. With a platform full of content concerns, it's hard to give voter support for family viewing to this Head of State.

Directed by Chris Rock. Starring Chris Rock, Bernie Mac, Dylan Baker. Running time: 95 minutes. Updated

Head of State Parents Guide

Mays is criticized for an off-the-cuff remark he made. Is it fair for politicians to be held responsible for personal comments? How does a public official’s position affect their private life?

Can a politician “take care of everybody”? What restraints do they face when meeting the needs of their constituents?

Is it important to dress for the job you want when looking for work? How do first impressions affect a job interview?

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