Picture from Dude, Where’s My Car?
Overall D+

Jessie (Ashton Kutcher) and Chester (Seann William Scott) are two low-life druggies who wake up one morning with a mystery on their hands--they can't remember where they parked their car.

Violence C
Sexual Content D+
Profanity C-
Substance Use D

MPAA Rating: PG-13 for language and some sex and drug-related humor.

Dude, Where’s My Car?

Are you ready dude? Here's the deal...

Dude, Where's My Car? - Official site Jessie (Ashton Kutcher) and Chester (Seann William Scott) are two low-life druggies who wake up one morning with a mystery on their hands--they can't remember where they parked their car. Nor can they remember trashing their girlfriends' house (they date twin sisters who appear amazingly normal considering their choice of "dudes") or the name of the man who is urinating on their houseplants. But most importantly, they've forgotten today is their girlfriend's anniversary--although they do remember buying them very nice presents... which are lost with the car.

Dude, Where's My Car? - Official site Setting out like detectives, the half-witted duo call upon a variety of acquaintances in an attempt to figure out where they were the night before. Going to a pothead friend they find his pooch smoking a hashpipe (like master, like dog). At a striptease club, they discover they had a large sum of cash with which they bought sexual favors, including a lap dance from a "she" that the light of day and a close-up of its panties reveals was really a "he."

Dude, Where's My Car? - Official site Other stops include a moment on the street to fondle the breasts of a woman who thanks them for paying $500 to see her chest the night before, and a police station full of donut munching cops who explain why they mistakenly impounded their car. Meanwhile, the boys are being pursued by a group of sensuous aliens (who appear to be humans) offering to sexually "pleasure them" if they return a high-tech device that could destroy the universe. Yup, they had that too last night.

Writer Philip Stark (creator of the television series The 70's Show) claims Dude is merely about "me and my buddies" and wanted to use the idea to create a take-off on teenage high school comedies. While the writing is good enough (surprisingly) to keep audiences interested, parents should be aware that this film portrays recreational drug use and sex in a comedic and even positive way. Throw in a few kilos of sexual innuendoes, crotch kicks, and scatological humor and Hey Dude! Where's the door?