Roll Bounce parents guide

Roll Bounce

Overall B

Looking like Saturday Night Fever on wheels, this 1970s disco era story follows a group of African-American youth (lead by Bow Wow) that challenge a gang of over-confident white kids (headed up by Wesley Jonathan) to a roller skating match.

Violence B
Sexual Content B-
Profanity C
Substance Use A-

Why is Roll Bounce rated PG-13? The MPAA rated Roll Bounce PG-13 for language and some crude humor.

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Roll Bounce
Rating & Content Info

Please read our content details for this movie to help determine if it is suitable. We also encourage you to check our full review.

Why is Roll Bounce rated PG-13? Roll Bounce is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for language and some crude humor.

These teen characters use some mild profanities, and one offers “the finger” in a moment of anger. However, such incidents are few and the young characters are usually considerate, even though they frequently tease each other. In a fit of rage, Xavier begins smashing his father’s already broken-down car, yet this scene offers a great moment of consolation between them. More content extends from adult characters, including women who dress provocatively and characters that remark about male and female anatomy. On a positive note, Curtis is committed to not drinking alcohol, and shows great compassion, patience, and physical restraint with his son.

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Roll Bounce
Canadian Movie Rating Info
Province Rating Rating Descriptor
British Columbia PG Coarse Language
Alberta PG
Manitoba PG
Ontario PG
Quebec G
Martimes PG Language May Offend.
Canadian Home Video PG

News About "Roll Bounce"

Cast and Crew

Roll Bounce is directed by and stars Bow Wow, Chi McBride, Mike Epps.

Home Video

The most recent home video release of Roll Bounce movie is December 12, 2005. Here are some details…

Rolling onto DVD in either wide or full screen, Twentieth Century Fox takes you behind the rink with a making-of featurette, a look at the film’s 70s stylin’, a profile on Bow Wow, and commentaries from actors Bow Wow, Chi McBride and Mike Epps, the director Malcolm Lee as well as the producers and screen writers. Other disco ball glitter includes twelve deleted scenes (with optional commentary), a gag reel, a Cinemax Special, music video and soundtrack spot. Audio tracks are available in English (Dolby Surround 5.1) with subtitles in English and Spanish.

Related home video titles:

Flashbacks to the 1970s create some humor in the movie Fat Albert. Another group of teens face off in the film Drumline—only this time they are members of a marching band.