The Beatles: Eight Days a Week parents guide

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week

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Between 1963 and 1966, The Beatles presented 250 concerts. This Ron Howard documentary uses historic and recently found footage, plus interviews, stories and music to showcase the British band during this prolific performance period.

Why is The Beatles: Eight Days a Week rated PG? The MPAA rated The Beatles: Eight Days a Week PG

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week
Rating & Content Info

Please Note: We have not viewed this movie. The information below is a summary based on data gathered from government and industry sponsored film classification agencies in various global regions.

Why is The Beatles: Eight Days a Week rated PG? The Beatles: Eight Days a Week is rated PG by the MPAA

Violence:
- Some scenes may frighten children.

Language:
- Infrequent use of the sexual expletive and scatological slang.

Alcohol / Drug Use:
- Infrequent references to illegal drug use.
- Frequent depictions of tobacco use.

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The Beatles: Eight Days a Week
Canadian Movie Rating Info
Province Rating Rating Descriptor
British Columbia PG Coarse Language.
Alberta PG Coarse Language, Substance Abuse.
Manitoba PG Language May Offend.
Ontario PG Tobacco Use.
Quebec G
Martimes PG
Canadian Home Video PG

? Limited Release

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week is currently in limited release. Therefore we may not be able to offer a full review on its release date. In the meantime, please check the Content Details section to find out what you can expect in this film.

News About "The Beatles: Eight Days a Week"

Cast and Crew

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week is directed by Ron Howard and stars Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, John Lennon, George Harrison.

Director Ron Howard (an avid Beatles' fan) is behind The Beatles: Eight Days a Week—The Touring Years. His 100-minute-long documentary covers the the band from the early 1960 when they performed in Liverpool’s Cavern Club to their last concert at San Francisco’s Candlestick Park in 1966. The film uses interviews with the surviving Beatles, as well as the widows of their deceased bandmates, archival footage, and never-before-seen shots taken by fans and amateurs that was collected during a crowdsourced, archival research project that began in 2003. Learn more about this production here.