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Synopsis

Crippled from the waist down in battle, Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) knows he will never walk again. Then he gets the unexpected opportunity to become an Avatar -- the mind link that controls the body of a genetically engineered alien life form. When he is sent to the home planet of the Na'vi and his virtual self begins interacting with the inhabitants, the soldier starts questioning the purpose of his military mission.

MPAA Rating PG-13 for intense epic battle sequences and warfare, sensuality, language and some smoking.
Theatrical Release December 18, 2009
Director James Cameron
Cast Sam Worthington, Sigourney Weaver, Michelle Rodriguez
Run Time 161
2009 Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation Official Movie Website

Full Review

Why did we give Avatar an overall grade of C+? Read our full movie review for parents.

Content Details

Why is Avatar rated PG-13?

Avatar has a grade of B- for sex, C+ for language and D+ for violence. Find out why...

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